Mold and Type 1 Diabetes

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No doctor has told me that our mold exposure caused Colin's juvenile diabetes onset in June of 2007. I can't prove that it did. But there's no doubt in my mind. When we moved into our dream home in June of 2000 Colin was 6 months old. In light of the 7 older siblings who needed bedrooms Colin drew the short straw. We converted a large closet into a "Blue's Clue's" room. The closet was directly below the master bedroom shower where we would discover stachybotrys 8 years later. With the knowledge I have now I would never put a baby in an unventilated room. This is the reason I suggest opening windows whenever possible. Air circulation is critical. Within months after our move, Colin developed swollen adenoids. The pediatrician was undaunted by this and recommended surgery at age 8 if they were still swollen. I now know that swollen adenoids indicate a stress on the glands due to bacteria, virus, or fungi.

In May of 2007 we uncovered mold in the downstairs bathroom (located below Colin's original room). You will read this in "our story" which is located in the helpful links section of this blog. The mold was improperly remediated and all of us were exposed to high levels of toxic black mold. On June 24th (7 weeks after the exposure) my oldest daughter took Colin to a movie. She said he had to go to the bathroom numerous times. On June 25th we took Colin to a sporting event in Denver. We had to pull off the Interstate to let him go to the bathroom and then take him numerous times once we arrived. I was sure it was a bladder infection. He looked thin but he was a growing boy. The next day I took him to the doctor expecting a prescription for an antibiotic. We ended up in the emergency room.

Colin does amazingly well with his new life. Five shots a day and multiple finger pokes have somehow become routine. It's the other issues like numbness, migraines, rashes, and severe abdominal pain that get him down. These are slowly getting better. His pancreas won't get better. I hope for a cure one day. Perhaps his story will help others.